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Setup guide

Started by Aritz, May 08, 2011, 08:04:07 PM

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Aritz

May 08, 2011, 08:04:07 PM Last Edit: May 09, 2011, 10:15:52 AM by Aritz
Lets post our tips about the setups.

I will try to explain with my poor english what I know of the real karts first (not so much!!)

Caster: The more caster you have, the more radical is the turning. Low values makes the kart easy to drive but you can feel understeer. High values makes the kart fast to turn but hard to mantain the racing line and hard to control the oversteer. I feel the changes a little exagerated in KRP comparing with my real experience.

Camber: High values help the low speed turns, when the front wheel blends because of the lateral forces and when you have the steering wheel straight, the less front wheel contact helps with the usual oversteer of the exit on the turns. High vales do the kart faster on the straights because of the low friction (less contact with the tarmac) I don't really know what's the point of the positive or low values. Here I am quite lost. In real world, I always use high values.

Pressure: High values will warm the tyre fast but soon they will warm too much after a few laps! In my real experience, more pressure=more grip (if the tyre temp is inside the working values!), just the opposite of the big cars. The pressure is, by far, the most important setting on a kart. If you put 200 or 250 gr less air than the best value, you will loose 0,3 - 0,6 sec for lap. If you put more than the best value, you will do the best lap soon but after that, you will loose more and more lap after lap. Track temp is critical of course, but you can run fast even with low temp with high values of pressure. I don't see this kind of differences in KRP, but maybe I need more testing :)

Track width REAR: The width of the kart is very important! You have to think how the kart works: we dont have differential, so the only way to turn is to have one wheel on the air! Think about it; rear blocked axle will not let you to turn, it doesn't want to! If you have a rear long axle, high value on the rear width, you barely will put the kart "on three wheels" if the grip is low... But if your axle is short, is easier to lift off the inside rear wheel. So the best value is as long as the track grip lets you (more width makes the kart more stable obviously)

Track width FRONT: More width helps on the slow turns, but you can't put high values because of the rear width setup. In wet there is no option... you have to put high values or you will not be able to turn in the first place, once the kart is turning, the best control way is the gas :)

Height: This setting is easy; more heigth = more grip. You can change the values looking for the stability of the kart. If you have oversteering, you can lower the front and rise the rear and viceversa.

Seat: Higher seat will give you more rear grip but maybe you will have problems on slow turns, it wil be harder to lift off the rear inside wheel (remember the "differential effect" ;) )

Toe IN: The front wheels are not parallel. You can put them convergent or divergent (or parallel) but the only way to have a racing kart is to put them divergent. The more divergency, the faster will be the steering wheel but the less stability aswell. You can have a very quick kart but you will do turns on straights too :D

Ackerman: This is a strange stuff for begginers and hard for me to explain...maybe I am wrong too!! The ackerman is the wheel turn ratio adjustment. Here my english will be not able to explain it correctly, sorry. If you have less ackerman, your wheels will turn almost the same depending if they are inside or outside wheel, so in slow turns the inside wheel will not turn enough and you will feel understeering. If you have high value, you will have a better slow turn control but worse in fast one. Please, maybe I am wrong here!

Rear Axle: Very difficult to explain... No one have the last word, the best is to test. My experience is that hard axles are for high grip and soft for the opposite, but you will hear all versions...

Bars: The bars will become the kart harder. Those bars are extremly hard to explain, you have to test them. Usually kart hardness will do the kart less grippy but is not as easy ;)

Please, I am not an expert at all!! I can be completely wrong about everything, feel free to fix my mistakes ;)


aireisor

May 08, 2011, 08:37:33 PM #1 Last Edit: May 08, 2011, 08:39:22 PM by aireisor
In some karting manual I've read that it is best to have as narrow front track as possible. Can somebody explain why is that?

Quote from: Aritz on May 08, 2011, 08:04:07 PM
I don't see this kind of differences in KRP, but maybe I need more testing :)

Please post about your findings after testing more with the tyres :)

oppolo

Quote from: Aritz on May 08, 2011, 08:04:07 PM
Camber: High values help the low speed turns, when the front wheel blends because of the lateral forces and when you have the steering wheel straight, the less front wheel contact helps with the usual oversteer of the exit on the turns. High vales do the kart faster on the straights because of the low friction (less contact with the tarmac ) I don't really know what's the point of the negative or low values. Here I am quite lost. In real world, I always use high values.

i think you mean "positive"

here there is written positive camber is used in very wet condition
http://www.dannypoggi.it/pagine/Assetto/assetto_kart.asp
Su circuiti a bassa aderenza e sul bagnato si utilizza un camber neutro o addirittura positivo  sul bagnato eccessivo.

Aritz


EVO

May 09, 2011, 10:48:08 AM #4 Last Edit: October 31, 2011, 12:35:55 AM by evo1087
Quote from: aireisor on May 08, 2011, 08:37:33 PM
In some karting manual I've read that it is best to have as narrow front track as possible. Can somebody explain why is that?
A wide front track gives great turn in handling. Like the KTM XBOW (wider in front than rear)

This is from the CRG manual
"Widening the front track will create more of a jacking effect when the wheels are
turned. This will result in more front end grip and quicker turn in. Narrowing the front track will have the
opposite effect. This will result in slower turn in and less front end bite."

However when their is more grip available you may want to narrow the front track because excess grip will slow you down (bind the kart)
To download all my dashes, airboxes, tracks, and more
click here or see my personal website

Aritz

And?

Which are your feelings? How do you setup the kart?

I tried widenning the tracks (both) and the kart is a lot easier to drive (maybe I had a good day lol) That way I was able to try more caster too, the kart was quite fast (high caster) and quite controllable (high wideness)

Now my quest is to have more grip in both axis and to learn more about tyre pressures, any advice?  I can't feel big differences between low and high pressures, do you?

Please, don't keep secrets so soon, we are friends yet :D

oppolo

Quote from: Aritz on May 26, 2011, 07:58:45 PM
And?

Which are your feelings? How do you setup the kart?

I tried widenning the tracks (both) and the kart is a lot easier to drive (maybe I had a good day lol) That way I was able to try more caster too, the kart was quite fast (high caster) and quite controllable (high wideness)

Now my quest is to have more grip in both axis and to learn more about tyre pressures, any advice?  I can't feel big differences between low and high pressures, do you?

Please, don't keep secrets so soon, we are friends yet :D

generally i use rear axe 50 medium, rear width +1, seat -1, but in other tracks i have different values and i'm working on it all the time,  in essay it was good for the last fast corner put the mid bar from loose to flat but this not helped in the fast corner after start in lonato and i have still problems,  for tyres pressure i am like you confused and i need more tests

Schwoni

Quote from: Aritz on May 26, 2011, 07:58:45 PM
And?

Which are your feelings? How do you setup the kart?

I tried widenning the tracks (both) and the kart is a lot easier to drive (maybe I had a good day lol) That way I was able to try more caster too, the kart was quite fast (high caster) and quite controllable (high wideness)

Now my quest is to have more grip in both axis and to learn more about tyre pressures, any advice?  I can't feel big differences between low and high pressures, do you?

Please, don't keep secrets so soon, we are friends yet :D

You are right and with tyres i don`t have noticed any changings on the track no grip differnce and also  not really temp. diferrences.
one of the importest thing is the seat position my opinion. try a lil bit i think this changes the most for more grip.

oppolo

Quote from: oppolo on May 26, 2011, 09:31:37 PM
but this not helped in the fast corner after start in lonato and i have still problems
i found i can this turn better with ackerman min

T.J. Koyen

Most all of what you posted seems pretty accurate to real-world Aritz! And it seems to apply mostly true to the game as well which is great :)

I agree with Schwoni that seat position is really important. I like to move mine back one or two clicks to get more rear grip.

For tyre pressure, I've noticed that the lower pressure makes the kart take a while to get up to normal grip levels, as you'd expect. I've been running 9.4 psi lately, which is comparable to the tyres I use in real-life.

aireisor,

A narrow front track will let the kart roll more freely off the corner and scrub less speed off. As with any adjustment in karting, it is a trade-off to find the right balance between your turn-in grip and your speed off the corner. The wider front will help on turn-in, but it also tends to set the inside rear wheel down quicker too, binding the kart on exit more. If you can run a narrow front track without giving up turn-in grip, you can get off the corner better and down the straight faster.

On axles, I haven't really felt much difference in KRP between them. Typically I run medium to hard in real-life, because they allow the rear to pick up quicker (more direct transfer of weight) and give the rear more stability. Axle tuning is really a fine art though as you said Aritz. Axles will do different things under different track conditions. A stiff axle may work well on a cold day since you're digging the outside tire into the track harder and you're getting more traction. A stiff axle may also work on a warm day with lots of grip as you are able to get a better transfer of weight and quicker lift. I always start at medium and then adjust according to the track conditions.

I wrote a setup guide for the Merlin kart, maybe I'll post it if you guys are interested in seeing it?
Merlin/Parilla
Team MerlinUSA Factory Driver
www.merlinusa.com
www.oktanevisual.com
www.koyen.net

Aritz

Of course!

thank you T.J. :)

T.J. Koyen

Here it is. Hopefully it applies to KRP as well as it has so far in real-life!

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=09DHA2NL
Merlin/Parilla
Team MerlinUSA Factory Driver
www.merlinusa.com
www.oktanevisual.com
www.koyen.net

aireisor

Quote from: T.J. Koyen on May 27, 2011, 04:21:50 PM
Here it is. Hopefully it applies to KRP as well as it has so far in real-life!

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=09DHA2NL

The file you are trying to access is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

T.J. Koyen

Merlin/Parilla
Team MerlinUSA Factory Driver
www.merlinusa.com
www.oktanevisual.com
www.koyen.net

EVO

whoa the fubar girl is hot(megaupload).. thanky you T.J. that all makes so much sense.i have run a soft axel in low grip conditions becuase i didnt have a harder one and notice this. I finally puchased a harder axle. I cant wait to try it. Those soft ones are like spaghetti in green conditions.  It is great that the game is becoming more accurate
To download all my dashes, airboxes, tracks, and more
click here or see my personal website